501(c)(3)s and California recall elections

I recently excavated an old piece from an archived hard drive that is suddenly relevant again… whether public charities can engage in activity around a recall election in California. This piece was published by Center for Nonprofit Management in their publication Nonprofit Prism on August 27, 2003. Since it’s not available online anymore, I’m republishing it here in its entirety. 2021 Tim would take a blue pen to this, but 2003 Tim was good with it. 


Best Supporting Actors: Public Charities’ Important Role in the California Gubernatorial Recall

In the past, summers of odd-numbered years were more focused on vacations and sunshine than major elections.  California’s summer of 2003 has turned conventional wisdom on its head as Governor Gray Davis faces an unprecedented recall election.  Proponents championed a successful petition drive in July that has produced an October 7th election when voters will decide whether to remove the governor from office and, if so, elect his replacement.  Because of the colorful participants, the campaign’s short time frame, and the power shift at stake, public charities are particularly positioned to play critical roles during the recall vote campaign. 

Charities limited, but important

Tax law strictly prohibits charities from supporting or opposing candidates for public office.  The outcome of the recall ballot will determine who will be governor for the remainder of the term, so charities cannot campaign substantively on either question.  The bottom line is that they may never implicitly or explicitly give an opinion on the recall or any particular candidate. 

Despite this limitation, charities can play an important role between now and October by taking on nonpartisan activities.  With political groups focusing limited time and resources on the outcome of the election, charities can fill a vacuum in voter registration, nonpartisan voter education, and get-out-the-vote drives.  

Voter registration

California’s favorable election laws allow residents who are U.S. citizens over the age of 18 to register to vote as close as 15 days before the election.  This gives charities a unique opportunity to capitalize on the increased interest in the election.  It is also a good time to remind people to register for an absentee ballot, which is available to all voters, whether or not they will be out of town, from early September to seven days before the election.  Regardless of the type voter registration, charities may not support or oppose any candidate or otherwise suggest a position on the recall vote.  

Educating the voters

Rather than shrink away from the law’s electioneering ban charities should embrace what it allows, taking on the role of providing nonpartisan candidate information.  The IRS looks at all factors when deciding if voter education is nonpartisan, including the timing of the event or publication, and how it fits in with candidate speeches and advertisements.  It is also critical that the presentation is non-biased and covers a broad array of issues to avoid showing single-issue favoritism for one candidate over another.   Some possible voter education activities include:

  • Setting up practice voting stations prior to Election Day to allow nervous first-timers a dry run;
  • Producing nonpartisan voter guides that print candidates’ answers to a nonbiased questionnaire on a broad set of issues facing the state;
  • Hosting nonpartisan candidate debates.

Although the campaign season is dramatically shorter than most, there is time for charities to plan these permissible activities if they act quickly.

Getting out the vote

The IRS approves of charities encouraging or helping people to vote, so long as they do not support or oppose any candidates.  Charities may provide services to disadvantaged voters, such as rides to the polling places for people with disabilities, seniors or people without adequate transportation.  They can also put out public service advertisements that generally encourage people to vote.

Role of a lifetime

Charitable organizations are uniquely qualified as community leaders to provide voters with important information and services for the recall election.  This high profile election provides an exceptional opportunity for charities to serve the public interest.  Like an actor in a film, charities may not take on a starring role in the recall election, but their important presence can make a substantial difference in their community and the election process.

SCOTUS Settles Robocaller Debate

On April 1, the Supreme Court settled a technical dispute between two camps in the federal Circuit Court of Appeals over what constitutes an automatic telephone dialing system, more commonly referred to as a robocaller.

In Facebook v.Duguid, the Court ruled that a device or software that only stores telephone numbers but does not also have “a random or sequential number generator” as part of its functionality is not an autodialer. Therefore, the numbers dialed don’t require the consent of the receiving party under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA).

Read more at Bolder Advocacy’s blog.

The Pedalshift Project 238: Paw Paw Tunnel Bypass – Part 2

Part two on my two day trip from Hancock, MD to Paw Paw, WV and back focuses on how I handled the frigid night at camp and then the bypass trail itself, plus a fun discovery on the other side.


Pedalshift 238: Paw Paw Tunnel Bypass Part 2

Hey it’s the direct download link for  The Pedalshift Project 238: Paw Paw Tunnel Bypass – Part 2 (mp3).

Subscribe/Follow The Pedalshift Project:
RSSiTunes – Overcast – Android – Google Podcasts – StitcherTuneIn – IHeartRadio – Spotify

Reach out to the show via email, Twitter and Instagram. Don’t forget to join the newsletter too.

Have some bike touring or overnight stories to share? Send your pics, audio or a quick tweet – all welcome. Email the show at pedalshift@pedalshift.net or call the lightly-used Pedalshift voicemail line at (202) 930-1109

Pedalshift Tour Journals: Paw Paw Tunnel Bypass – Part 2

A little background… the NPS is closing the tunnel… for real this time… to complete a massive descaling project on the downstream side of the Paw Paw tunnel. That means when it’s closed, the only way to continue on the towpath is to go up and over the mountain the tunnel goes through.

I had never done it. Until this trip.

Part 2 focuses on how I handled the frigid night at camp and then the bypass trail itself, plus a fun discovery on the other side. 

Housekeeping

Reminder… new music!

Brock Dittus – Most Important Thing

Sunfields new album Late Bloomers available now

Next week: Best of!

In one week: part three of Tour Journals: Paw Paw Tunnel Bypass, PLUS… 

SAVE THE DATE… Pedalshift Live Friday April 30, 9pm ET, 6pm PT

As always we like to close out the show with a special shoutout to the Pedalshift Society! Because of support from listeners like you, Pedalshift is a weekly bicycle touring podcast with a global community, expanding into live shows and covering new tours like this spring’s DC to Cincinnatti bike tour! If you like what you hear, you can support the show for 5 bucks, 2 bucks or even a buck a month. And there’s one-shot and annual options if you’re not into the small monthly thing. Check it all out at pedalshift.net/society.

Kimberly Wilson
Caleb Jenkinson
Cameron Lien
Andrew MacGregor
Michael Hart
Keith Nagel
Brock Dittus
Thomas Skadow
Marco Lo
Terrance Manson
Harry Telgadas
Chris Barron
Mark Van Raam
Brad Hipwell
Mr. T
Nathan Poulton
Stephen Dickerson
Vince LoGreco
Cody Floerchinger
Tom Benenati
Greg Braithwaite
Sandy Pizzio
Jeff Muster
Seth Pollack
Joseph Quinn
Drue Porter
Byron Paterson
Joachim Raber
Ray Jackson
Jeff Frey
Kenny Mikey
Lisa Hart
John Denkler
Steve Hankel
Miguel Quinones
Alejandro Avilés-Reyes
Keith Spangler
Greg Towner
Dan Gebhart, RIP
Jody Dzuranin
Lucas Barwick
Michael Baker
Brian Bechtol
Reinhart Bigl
Greg Middlemis
Connie Moore
William Gothmann
Brian Benton
Joan Churchill
Mike Bender
Rick Weinberg
Billy Crafton
Gary Matushak
Greg L’Etoile-Lopes
James Sloan
Jonathan Dillard
John Funk
Tom Bilcze
Ronald Piroli
Dave Roll
Brian Hafner
Misha LeBlanc
Ari Messinger
David Gratke
Todd Groesbeck
Wally Estrella
Sue Reinert
John Leko
Stephen Granata
Phillip Mueller
Robert Lackey
Dominic Carol
Jacqi McCulloch
John Hickman
Carl Presseault
David Neves
Patty Louise
Terry Fitzgerald
Peter Steinmetz
Timothy Fitzpatrick
Michael Liszewski
Hank O’Donnell
David Zanoni
David Weil
Matthew Sponseller
Chad Reno
Daniel Gregor
Spartan Dale
Carolyn Ferguson

Music

You’ve been hearing about Jason Kent and his music for many fine episodes. Sunfields has a new album available NOW, AND Jason has a new solo album coming this year, AND his first solo album is now streaming on Spotify, including America, the Pedalshift theme. Go listen!

The post The Pedalshift Project 238: Paw Paw Tunnel Bypass – Part 2 appeared first on Pedalshift.

Advocacy Against Hate

The proliferation of hate speech has fanned the flames of anti-Asian sentiment with messages associating China with the COVID-19 pandemic, all while downplaying the real and present threat of domestic terrorism fueled by white nationalism. And as we have seen over and over, speech has consequences with blood on the hands of murderers — not only in recent shootings but for the consistent escalation of violence against Asian Americans and others. 

A disturbing combination of widespread prejudicial sentiment and easy access to guns makes tragedies like this far too common. Messages of misogyny, xenophobia, and white supremacy fill the air we breathe, masquerading as conservative sentiment as they infect the minds of those who could be spurred to act violently. In recent years, we have seen targeted attacks against people of color, religious minorities, the LGBTQ community, and other vulnerable populations, and we have failed to address the patterns of who commits these atrocities and what inspires and allows them to do so. 

On this episode, we’ll be talking about nonprofit advocacy against hate, bigotry, and discrimination.   

 

Attorney Co-hosts  

Jen 

Quyen 

Shyaam 

 

Introduction 

  • Nonprofits have an essential role to play in fighting hate in all its forms, by educating the public, pressuring elected officials and candidates, and organizing community members to raise awareness about identity-based violence and discrimination. We’re going to highlight a few nonprofit advocacy efforts today, and talk about how you can stand up to hate as a nonprofit organization.  
  • We have to acknowledge what’s happening now and our collective past history  
  • Attacks against people based on their race or ethnicity 
  • Rise in hate incidents and hate crimes against APA community because of Trump’s insistence on blaming China for the coronavirus 
  • Between March 2020 and Feb 2021, almost 3,800 incidents reported to Stop AAPI Hate. Fraction of the real number. 
  • Attacks against Middle Eastern, Arab, or Muslim Americans after 9/11 
  • LGBTQIA+, violence against trans-people 
  • We want to be clear that we know there’s so many ways hate is spreading right now, but we chose to lift up a few examples to affirm for public charities that Combating Hate is always on mission.   
  • This episode isn’t heavy on rules.  If you’ve been listening, you know that public charities can’t be partisan and that to determine partisanship, the IRS will apply the facts and circumstances test to campaigns and communications.   For 501(c)(3) organizations, the important analysis will be to understand an organization’s risk and the continuity of its messages.  

Example 1: Briefly Review the Facts and Circumstances Test for Public Charities. What about anti-hate messaging when connected to voting – e.g., vote for love not hate! 

 

  • The IRS will apply a facts and circumstances test and while we don’t know everything the IRS would look at, here’s examples of how we would walk through the analysis. 
  •  Does the communication or ad or website reference a candidate or election? (that’s a no-no) 
  •  Is there some other external factor influencing the campaign like a bill up at the state house?  
  • Is this part of the on-going mission of the public charity? And is this messaging similar to or in connection with other forms of communications on the topic (i.e., part of an on-going long-standing campaign). 
  • If it’s a wedge issue, or looks like a campaign slogan, a nonprofit public charity should proceed with caution.   

 Example 2: NAKASEC.  The National Korean American Service & Education Consortium has an affiliated—or connected—501(c)(4) known as the NAKASEC Action Fund.  In 2020, NAKASEC AF wanted to forcefully push back against a Virginia Congressional Candidate selling a mask that suggested the coronavirus was “Made in China.”  This phrase was on the mask. They ended up releasing statements and a letter, and organized with partners. They explained that blaming China for the COVID-19 crisis has led to a sharp increase in racially motivated attacks against people of Chinese descent and others perceived to be of Chinese descent. In fact, in March of 2020, the FBI warned that hate crimes against Asian Americans were likely to rise because of perceptions that people of Asian descent were spreading the virus. Their advocacy was picked up by major media outlets. You can find stories on NAKASEC AF’s advocacy against these masks in the Washington Post, Fox News, NBC News, and numerous local outlets in Virginia. After a few days with public pressure, the candidate pulled the masks! 

  • As far as the rules go, 501(c)(3)s may not support or oppose candidates for public office, but c4s can, to a limited extent. there is room to even suggest candidates should be held accountable for actions like these in the election.  
  • Anti-hate is always on mission. Even though a 501(c)(4) took the action above, through our analysis, we think a 501(c)(3) likely could have as well.   
  • This is a great example of using your platform to fight discrimination even when the core of your mission is based on something else (here supporting and promoting running).  
  •  Example 4: Muslim Advocates. Muslim Advocates is a 501(c)(3) often calls out elected officials and other leaders for bigoted language against Muslims – for example, inventing threats posed by Muslims to the country, misinformation about what Islam requires of followers, or advocating for policies that would be a violation of basic constitutional rights of Muslims. Muslim Advocates has even done a report on campaigns in the past that have featured anti-Muslim rhetoric.   
  • There are a number of important points about these efforts, even though some were around elections. Where MA spotlighted or went into detail – it was around campaigns in elections that had already passed. They included disclaimers in their report, and they tried to summarize and describe the nature of comments rather than advocate for the election or defeat of any particular candidate or candidates. If you’re talking about campaigns and elections that have already passed, it’s important to not take credit for an outcome. It’s going to be risky to discuss campaigns still pending or upcoming elections – however, you could discuss comments in the aggregate.  
  • It’s still possible to be forceful, clear, and strong against hate as a 501(c)(3). 

 

 

Bolder Advocacy Resources 

 

Commenting on Candidates and Campaigns: https://www.bolderadvocacy.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Commenting_on_Candidates_and_Campaigns.pdf  

Commenting on Candidates’ Statements about Immigrants: https://www.bolderadvocacy.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Commenting-on-Candidates-Statements-about-Immigrants.pdf 

LGBTQ Toolkit: https://bolderadvocacy.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/LGBTQ-toolkit-2019-Final.pdf  

Press Statement on Atlanta Attacks:  https://www.afj.org/article/afj-condemns-hateful-attack-on-asian-americans/ 

 

 

Other resources: 

Department of Justice: https://www.justice.gov/hatecrimes, has link to state specific information 

LCCR Stop Hate: https://lawyerscommittee.org/project/stop-hate-project/  

Stop AAPI Hate: https://stopaapihate.org/ 

Muslim Advocates: https://muslimadvocates.org/advocacy/addressing-anti-muslim-political-rhetoric/ 

NAKASEC Action Fund’s letter: https://nakasecactionfund.org/11546 

Bob Jones University v. United Stateshttps://www.law.cornell.edu/supremecourt/text/461/574 

Best of Pedalshift 135: Lessons from the TransAmerica Trail

Pedalshift Beginners Series alum James Rosenberg checks in after his epic and successful 2018 ride across the United States on the TransAmerica Trail. We cover his favorite experiences, best and worst gear choices, and much more.

Originally podcast September 13, 2018.

Best of Pedalshift 135: Lessons from the TransAmerica Trail

The post Best of Pedalshift 135: Lessons from the TransAmerica Trail appeared first on Pedalshift.

The Pedalshift Project 237: Paw Paw Tunnel Bypass – Part 1

Part one on my two day trip from Hancock, MD to Paw Paw, WV and back, highlighting the Paw Paw Tunnel bypass trail.


Pedalshift 237: Paw Paw Tunnel Bypass Part 1

Hey it’s the direct download link for  The Pedalshift Project 237: Paw Paw Tunnel Bypass – Part 1 (mp3).

Subscribe/Follow The Pedalshift Project:
RSSiTunes – Overcast – Android – Google Podcasts – StitcherTuneIn – IHeartRadio – Spotify

Reach out to the show via email, Twitter and Instagram. Don’t forget to join the newsletter too.

Have some bike touring or overnight stories to share? Send your pics, audio or a quick tweet – all welcome. Email the show at pedalshift@pedalshift.net or call the lightly-used Pedalshift voicemail line at (202) 930-1109

Pedalshift Tour Journals: Paw Paw Tunnel Bypass – Part 1

A little background… the NPS is closing the tunnel… for real this time… to complete a massive descaling project on the downstream side of the Paw Paw tunnel. That means when it’s closed, the only way to continue on the towpath is to go up and over the mountain the tunnel goes through.

I had never done it. Until this trip.

Part 1 focuses on my ride to camp on the downstream side of the tunnel buuuut it’s a little more interesting than that. If you followed me on Insta you heard something happened(TM) Turns out I was recording, which is fun and awesome. HOWEVER the sound quality leading up to it was miserable. Like super bad. But I need you to hear how it went down, so bear with me here as we get rolling…

Paw Paw Tunnel Bypass Day 1 fender bender
Paw Paw Tunnel Bypass Day 1: catastrophic fender bender!

Housekeeping

Reminder… new music!

Brock Dittus – Most Important Thing

Sunfields new album Late Bloomers available now

Next week: Best of!

In two weeks: part two of Tour Journals: Paw Paw Tunnel Bypass, PLUS… some really good news if all goes as planned…

As always we like to close out the show with a special shoutout to the Pedalshift Society! Because of support from listeners like you, Pedalshift is a weekly bicycle touring podcast with a global community, expanding into live shows and covering new tours like this spring’s DC to Cincinnatti bike tour! If you like what you hear, you can support the show for 5 bucks, 2 bucks or even a buck a month. And there’s one-shot and annual options if you’re not into the small monthly thing. Check it all out at pedalshift.net/society.

Kimberly Wilson
Caleb Jenkinson
Cameron Lien
Andrew MacGregor
Michael Hart
Keith Nagel
Brock Dittus
Thomas Skadow
Marco Lo
Terrance Manson
Harry Telgadas
Chris Barron
Mark Van Raam
Brad Hipwell
Mr. T
Nathan Poulton
Stephen Dickerson
Vince LoGreco
Cody Floerchinger
Tom Benenati
Greg Braithwaite
Sandy Pizzio
Jeff Muster
Seth Pollack
Joseph Quinn
Drue Porter
Byron Paterson
Joachim Raber
Ray Jackson
Jeff Frey
Kenny Mikey
Lisa Hart
John Denkler
Steve Hankel
Miguel Quinones
Alejandro Avilés-Reyes
Keith Spangler
Greg Towner
Dan Gebhart, RIP
Jody Dzuranin
Lucas Barwick
Michael Baker
Brian Bechtol
Reinhart Bigl
Greg Middlemis
Connie Moore
William Gothmann
Brian Benton
Joan Churchill
Mike Bender
Rick Weinberg
Billy Crafton
Gary Matushak
Greg L’Etoile-Lopes
James Sloan
Jonathan Dillard
John Funk
Tom Bilcze
Ronald Piroli
Dave Roll
Brian Hafner
Misha LeBlanc
Ari Messinger
David Gratke
Todd Groesbeck
Wally Estrella
Sue Reinert
John Leko
Stephen Granata
Phillip Mueller
Robert Lackey
Dominic Carol
Jacqi McCulloch
John Hickman
Carl Presseault
David Neves
Patty Louise
Terry Fitzgerald
Peter Steinmetz
Timothy Fitzpatrick
Michael Liszewski
Hank O’Donnell
David Zanoni
David Weil
Matthew Sponseller
Chad Reno
Daniel Gregor
Spartan Dale
Carolyn Ferguson

Music

You’ve been hearing about Jason Kent and his music for many fine episodes. Sunfields has a new album available NOW, AND Jason has a new solo album coming this year, AND his first solo album is now streaming on Spotify, including America, the Pedalshift theme. Go listen!

The post The Pedalshift Project 237: Paw Paw Tunnel Bypass – Part 1 appeared first on Pedalshift.

Lobbying Series Part 6 – Redistricting

On this episode, we’ll be talking about that special once a decade process of redistricting.   

 

Because this is the sixth episode in our lobbying series, we’re describing this as your midterm test, applying our lobbying and advocacy 101 podcasts to a particular policy proposal: redistricting.   

 

Attorney Co-hosts  

Jen 

Tim  

Quyen 

  

A brief civics lesson about redistricting—the process by which the states draw lines on a map to create electoral districts.   

  • The census is constitutionally required in part because our federal house of representatives originally kept growing to proportionally represent an entire state’s population. 
  • Fun facts: Because the house of representatives kept growing as our country grew, Congress adopted a “cap” of 435 house members under the Apportionment Act of 1911. That cap is still alive today. 
  • For redistricting at the federal level then, every census requires we count each individual.  Then the Congress apportions the 435 seats to the states based on the population changes.  In other words, Congress gets to reassign some seats to states with big populations so that they get a “larger voice” in the house of representatives. 
  • Once apportioned, the last step is that a state process occurs and lines on a map are drawn to determine the districts for those federal elected officials as well as state and local elected seats. 

 

Since we’re dealing with Covid still, the timelines for this process have been pushed.  There’s plenty of time for you to get involved and make your voice heard.  

 

Are all states the same?  

  • Of course not!  Because states are permitted to draw the lines, every state has a unique approach with some states allowing the state legislature to vote on the map while others provide a bi-partisan or other type of citizen driven commission.   

Redistricting rules of the road 

 

While it would be fun to discuss the laws and legal standards about how to draw a district –things like ensuring roughly an equal number of voters in each district, and that districts do not unfairly pack certain voters into one space while cracking geographic or other affinity groups into multiple districts.  This podcast is about what you—as a public charity or a private foundation—can do in your state around this process.  

 

  • So what does that mean:  it means lobbying for equality and justice in states where the legislature must approve the maps. 
  • It can also mean plain old advocacy in states where there is a commission adopted to deal with this process.  

 

For example, in California, there’s a commission that draws the maps and it is made up only of citizens that apply and go through a rather lengthy process.   

 

  • This means advocacy to the commission is not lobbying.   
  • Since the commission is formed though, so long as it has the final authority to finalize the map of the districts, then any work contacting the commissioners, appearing before the commission, even drawing your own map and providing it to the commissioners will not be considered lobbying. 
  • Since every state does this process a little different, check out our links below that will take you directly to how your state conducts this process.   

 

In contrast, in Texas, as in most states, redistricting still requires the state legislatures to adopt the maps.  For a public charity, this means working with legislators on redistricting is lobbying.   

 

  • As a public charity, you can always lobby on items that your legislature has to vote on and maps drawn by the legislators for how you elect your representatives is no different. 
  • Your lobbying can include items that address the historical discriminatory patterns related to race, but also items that make your community unique.  Some items that can generally be looked at include: 
  • Income levels 
  • Housing patterns (suburban, rural etc) 
  • Language or cultural identification  
  • Environmental conditions 
  • Another great example for lobbying is to know the model!  For example, in Texas, members of the public will have access to the same program (RedAppl) to draw alternative maps for legislators’ consideration but unless your organization understands how the program works—what assumptions it makes about various factors related to population (age, race, sex etc), you won’t really have a good idea of how those maps are dividing up communities.   

 

But as a public charity, in either states that use the legislative process or those with citizen appointed or other forms of commission, a public charity cannot engage in partisan politics.  

  • Items that a nonprofit public charity could not lobby on include things like “saving a seat” or “flipping the district.” 
  • Why?  Well, that is partisan work—the same lobbying rules apply to redistricting maps and methods as apply to your work on getting a new bill passed.  Stay on policy, and avoid mentioning candidates, races, or elections.  

  

What about private foundations funding this work? 

 

  • We plan to do a whole series on how to fund effective work.  But for this episode, its important to know that private foundations can fund organizations that do advocacy and those that do lobbying as well. 
  • Private foundations cannot earmark grants for lobbying and there are some rules for private foundations to ensure they are not using their own dollars to lobby indirectly in ways that they are not permitted to do directly.   
  • But beyond that, the philanthropic world should be concerned with redistricting not only at the federal level for the House of Representatives, but at the state level for city council districts, state districts etc. 

 

What?!  The state gets to draw new lines for its own house of representatives too? 

 

  • That’s right:  redistricting isn’t just for the federal house of representatives.  As states grow in population, states have to redraw their own lines, and even some cities do the same thing.  This is in part to abide by the principle of one person one vote, but also because our communities constantly change shape and size.   

 

This is why its so important for nonprofits to ensure their community knows this process is happening.   

 

Bolder Advocacy Resources  

Other resources: 

https://www.ncsl.org/research/redistricting/redistricting-systems-a-50-state-overview.aspx 

https://www.everycrsreport.com/reports/R45951.html (2009) 

https://funderscommittee.org/files/Collaborative_RedistrictingGuide_2.pdf (2010) 

https://redistricting.lls.edu/ – PROF. JUSTIN LEVITT’S GUIDE TO DRAWING THE ELECTORAL LINES 

Timeline for Releasing Redistricting Data for updates from the US Census Bureau on the timeline 

The Pedalshift Project 236: Route Scouting IV – A New Route

The thrilling conclusion to our series scouting Pennsylvania Route S for a future tour! On this episode, we cover the section between Morgantown, PA and… well that would be telling.


Route Scouting IV: A New Route

Hey it’s the direct download link for  The Pedalshift Project 236: Route Scouting IV – A New Route (mp3).

Subscribe/Follow The Pedalshift Project:
RSSiTunes – Overcast – Android – Google Podcasts – StitcherTuneIn – IHeartRadio – Spotify

Reach out to the show via email, Twitter and Instagram. Don’t forget to join the newsletter too.

Have some bike touring or overnight stories to share? Send your pics, audio or a quick tweet – all welcome. Email the show at pedalshift@pedalshift.net or call the lightly-used Pedalshift voicemail line at (202) 930-1109

Housekeeping

Reminder… new music!

Brock Dittus – Most Important Thing

Sunfields new album Late Bloomers available now

Scouting Pennsylvania bike route S

  • Part of the route mentioned in Pedalshift 228 
  • Be sure to check out:
  • Coming soon: a brand new tour… the Paw Paw Tunnel bypass trail. And if you’re a fan of curve balls and mechanicals, you’ll definitely want to check out part 1 next week!

Click the map for the PDF… then click on those numbers for links to detailed sections. Source: PA DOT

Penn Bike Route S

As always we like to close out the show with a special shoutout to the Pedalshift Society! Because of support from listeners like you, Pedalshift is a weekly bicycle touring podcast with a global community, expanding into live shows and covering new tours like this spring’s DC to Cincinnatti bike tour! If you like what you hear, you can support the show for 5 bucks, 2 bucks or even a buck a month. And there’s one-shot and annual options if you’re not into the small monthly thing. Check it all out at pedalshift.net/society.

Kimberly Wilson
Caleb Jenkinson
Cameron Lien
Andrew MacGregor
Michael Hart
Keith Nagel
Brock Dittus
Thomas Skadow
Marco Lo
Terrance Manson
Harry Telgadas
Chris Barron
Mark Van Raam
Brad Hipwell
Mr. T
Nathan Poulton
Stephen Dickerson
Vince LoGreco
Cody Floerchinger
Tom Benenati
Greg Braithwaite
Sandy Pizzio
Jeff Muster
Seth Pollack
Joseph Quinn
Drue Porter
Byron Paterson
Joachim Raber
Ray Jackson
Jeff Frey
Kenny Mikey
Lisa Hart
John Denkler
Steve Hankel
Miguel Quinones
Alejandro Avilés-Reyes
Keith Spangler
Greg Towner
Dan Gebhart, RIP
Jody Dzuranin
Lucas Barwick
Michael Baker
Brian Bechtol
Reinhart Bigl
Greg Middlemis
Connie Moore
William Gothmann
Brian Benton
Joan Churchill
Mike Bender
Rick Weinberg
Billy Crafton
Gary Matushak
Greg L’Etoile-Lopes
James Sloan
Jonathan Dillard
John Funk
Tom Bilcze
Ronald Piroli
Dave Roll
Brian Hafner
Misha LeBlanc
Ari Messinger
David Gratke
Todd Groesbeck
Wally Estrella
Sue Reinert
John Leko
Stephen Granata
Phillip Mueller
Robert Lackey
Dominic Carol
Jacqi McCulloch
John Hickman
Carl Presseault
David Neves
Patty Louise
Terry Fitzgerald
Peter Steinmetz
Timothy Fitzpatrick
Michael Liszewski
Hank O’Donnell
David Zanoni
David Weil
Matthew Sponseller
Chad Reno
Daniel Gregor
Spartan Dale
Carolyn Ferguson

Music

You’ve been hearing about Jason Kent and his music for many fine episodes. Sunfields has a new album available NOW, AND Jason has a new solo album coming this year, AND his first solo album is now streaming on Spotify, including America, the Pedalshift theme. Go listen!

The post The Pedalshift Project 236: Route Scouting IV – A New Route appeared first on Pedalshift.

The Pedalshift Project 235: Route Scouting III – Revenge of South Central PA

Continuing scouting Pennsylvania Route S for a future tour! On this episode, the third edition of four, we cover the section of south central PA between York and Morgantown.


Hey it’s the direct download link for  The Pedalshift Project 235: Route Scouting III – Revenge of South Central PA (mp3).

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Housekeeping

Reminder… new music!

Brock Dittus – Most Important Thing

Sunfields new album Late Bloomers drops 3/12 and the first track – Got Some (But it Ain’t Enough)  is available now…

Scouting Pennsylvania bike route S

  • Part of the route mentioned in Pedalshift 228 
  • Be sure to check out:
  • We’ll continue scouting this route through the next several episodes… some surprises and a lot of insights
  • Coming soon: a brand new tour! The first of 2021!

Click the map for the PDF… then click on those numbers for links to detailed sections. Source: PA DOT

Penn Bike Route S

As always we like to close out the show with a special shoutout to the Pedalshift Society! Because of support from listeners like you, Pedalshift is a weekly bicycle touring podcast with a global community, expanding into live shows and covering new tours like this spring’s DC to Cincinnatti bike tour! If you like what you hear, you can support the show for 5 bucks, 2 bucks or even a buck a month. And there’s one-shot and annual options if you’re not into the small monthly thing. Check it all out at pedalshift.net/society.

Kimberly Wilson
Caleb Jenkinson
Cameron Lien
Andrew MacGregor
Michael Hart
Keith Nagel
Brock Dittus
Thomas Skadow
Marco Lo
Terrance Manson
Harry Telgadas
Chris Barron
Mark Van Raam
Brad Hipwell
Mr. T
Nathan Poulton
Stephen Dickerson
Vince LoGreco
Cody Floerchinger
Tom Benenati
Greg Braithwaite
Sandy Pizzio
Jeff Muster
Seth Pollack
Joseph Quinn
Drue Porter
Byron Paterson
Joachim Raber
Ray Jackson
Jeff Frey
Kenny Mikey
Lisa Hart
John Denkler
Steve Hankel
Miguel Quinones
Alejandro Avilés-Reyes
Keith Spangler
Greg Towner
Dan Gebhart, RIP
Jody Dzuranin
Lucas Barwick
Michael Baker
Brian Bechtol
Reinhart Bigl
Greg Middlemis
Connie Moore
William Gothmann
Brian Benton
Joan Churchill
Mike Bender
Rick Weinberg
Billy Crafton
Gary Matushak
Greg L’Etoile-Lopes
James Sloan
Jonathan Dillard
John Funk
Tom Bilcze
Ronald Piroli
Dave Roll
Brian Hafner
Misha LeBlanc
Ari Messinger
David Gratke
Todd Groesbeck
Wally Estrella
Sue Reinert
John Leko
Stephen Granata
Phillip Mueller
Robert Lackey
Dominic Carol
Jacqi McCulloch
John Hickman
Carl Presseault
David Neves
Patty Louise
Terry Fitzgerald
Peter Steinmetz
Timothy Fitzpatrick
Michael Liszewski
Hank O’Donnell
David Zanoni
David Weil
Matthew Sponseller
Chad Reno
Daniel Gregor
Spartan Dale
Carolyn Ferguson

Music

You’ve been hearing about Jason Kent and his music for many fine episodes. Sunfields has a new album in 2021, AND Jason has a new solo album in 2021, AND his first solo album is now streaming on Spotify, including America, the Pedalshift theme. Go listen!

The post The Pedalshift Project 235: Route Scouting III – Revenge of South Central PA appeared first on Pedalshift.

Lobbying Series Part 5 – Recordkeeping

Lobbying Series Part 5 – Recordkeeping 

On this episode, our fifth in our on-going lobbying series, we’ll focus on how 501(c)(3) public charities can keep good records of their lobbying and why it is important. 

Attorney Co-hosts 

  • Quyen Tu 
  • Tim Mooney 
  • Natalie Ossenfort 

Quick reminders: Check out the prior four episodes in our lobbying series on basics, definitions, and exceptions. 

Recordkeeping! The IRS must have a thousand rules! 

  • Would it surprise you that the answer is not really? 
  • IRS has a “reasonableness” standard 
  • If you are audited you are expected to be able to show your math on what you reported on your Form 990. 

 Why keep good records of your lobbying? 

  1. Charities must report their lobbying to the IRS every year.
  2. Exceeding lobbying limits leads to excise taxes and (eventually) jeopardizes tax-exempt status.
  3. Recordkeeping lets electing charities do more lobbying without fear.
  4. Recordkeeping helps a charity raise funds more effectively.
  5. Good recordkeeping is protection against false accusations.
  6. Recordkeeping is a good management tool. 

         

 What do you track? 

  • Direct Costs 
    • Travel 
    • Printing costs 
    • Anything with a receipt that is all or mostly for lobbying 
    • Primary purpose is lobbying? Count it all. Less than half? Split proportionately. 

   

  • Staff Time 
    • Best option: Timesheets 
    • Occasional lobbying: Lobbying “incident” report 
    • One-shot lobbying: Memo to file 

   

  • Overhead costs 
    • Easiest with time sheets 
    • Add up total hours worked and total hours spent on direct lobbying 
    • Apply the percentage to all overhead (rent, utilities, internet access, support staff, etc.) 
    • Repeat for grassroots lobbying 

   

Junk drawer of final thoughts 

  • Do not adopt a system just because it is used by another organization – use the one that is most reasonable for your organization. 
  • Remember there are state and local reporting requirements too – make sure those are integrated into your system. 
  • Timesheets have much more utility beyond tracking lobbying – consider that when making your decision on a system. 

 

Resources

Keeping Track: A Guide to Recordkeeping for Advocacy Charities 

Being a Player: A Guide to the IRS Lobbying Regulations for Advocacy Charities 

Sample Timesheets